Sunday, November 12, 2017

Recent Portfolio Website articles

http://www.digitalartsonline.co.uk/features/creative-business/10-best-portfolio-websites-for-artists-designers/

http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/online-portfolios-for-designers/



Building a Website

You are required to turn in a hard copy portfolio and have a website.  Your hard copy disc can be a collection of high quality JPEGs or a PDF document and your website can be made any number of ways...

Free(ish) Blog Sites that can double as Portfolio Sites (you must use a domain name with it)

Wordpress.com (managing) (themes) (portfolio)
Tumblr examplesmore
Blogger (example
Google Web Pages
Wordpress.org (set up) -must host the site (themes) (mistakes)

http://wiredcanvas.com/2015/08/websites-artists-how-make-artist-website-using-wordpress

Artists blogs that double as portfolio pages
Difference Between Wordpress.com and Wordpress.org
Routing a domain name through Wordpress.com
Routing a domain name through Blogger
Routing a domain name through Google Sites
Setting up a static front page in Blogger
Routing a domain name through Tumblr

Template and Theme  sites
http://btemplates.com/tag/art/
http://www.mybloggerthemes.com/
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/top-10-free-tumblr-themes-create-portfolio/
https://theme.wordpress.com/themes/subjects/portfolio/


examples - tumblr julia maria
blooger claudio valdez

Getting a Domain Name (10-40 dollars)

Bluehost - recommended for free domain with hosting purchase and easy wordpress install
Godaddy
Namecheap
Iwantmyname
Register

Pay Portfolio Sites

http://www.beautifullife.info/web-design/top-10-best-website-builders-creating-online-portfolio/

Squarespace (examples)
Format
Otherpeoplespixels (examples)
Carbonmade (examples)
Moonfruit
Artspan
Adobe Portfolio
Photoshelter
Foliolink
Portfoliobox
Wix (examples) (more)
Crevado
others...

Web services/online communities (have limited free options)

Behance
Dropr
Coroflot
Deviantart - must use the portfolio option
Weebly

others...

Professional Organizations (not free, but gets a lot of traffic)

AIGA Portfolios (design)
Photographic Society of America

DIY
Adobe Muse or Dreamweaver
Creating web galleries in adobe Lightroom

How to make an artist website
Creative Capital recommendations

For class you must have a website with your own domain name that is a portfolio site.  Meaning it only shows your best work and your contact information and statement.  It should be professional enough to show an employer.  Then you are encouraged to put up your work on other social media sites.

Your site should have (and only have)
Images of your best work
An Artist Bio
Artist Statement
Upcoming Exhibitions or News items
Contact Information
links to other social media sites/blogs (optional)

Monday, October 23, 2017

Artist/Designer Statement

(this post taken from pacificgraphicdesign)
“Why do I have to write an artist statement? It’s stupid. If I wanted to write to express myself I would have been a writer. The whole idea of my art is to say things visually. Why can’t people just look at my art and take away whatever experiences they will?”
Think about what you wrote in answer to the essay questions concerning “What is Art”, What is Design”, etc. These can help you form your Artist statement.
Some examples:
Be honest with yourself. Before you write a word, take some time to just think about you and your art. You need to understand what it is that you are trying to achieve, before you attempt to explain it to anyone else.
  • Ask yourself what you’re doing. What does your art express? What makes your art unique?
  • Ask yourself why you’re doing it. What motivates you to create art? What emotions or ideas are you trying to convey? What does your art mean to you?
  • Ask yourself how you’re doing it. What do you draw inspiration from? What tools and materials do you use?
Consider your influences. Think about the things that influence you, whether it’s art, music, literature, history, politics or the environment. Think about how these influences have made an impression on you and how they manifest themselves in your work. Try to be as specific as possible.
Make a mind-map. Mind-mapping is a good way to free your thinking. It will also help you to trace the relationship between different ideas.
  • Jot down a key idea that informs your work in the center of a blank page. Then spend 15 minutes writing down any words, phrases, feelings, techniques etc. related to that idea.
  • Free writing is another technique that can help get the creative juices going. Spend 5-10 minutes writing whatever pops into your head when you think about your art. You’ll be amazed at what you come up with.
Determine what you want people to understand. Think about what you want people to take away from your art. What message or emotion are you trying to convey?
Another Approach:
Make a statement about why you do what you do. The first section of your artist’s statement should begin with a discussion of why you make art. Try to make it as personal as possible. Talk about what your goals are and what you hope to achieve through your art.
Describe your decision-making techniques. In the second section of you statement, tell the reader about your decision-making process. How do you select a theme? How do you choose what materials to use? What techniques to utilize? Keep it simple and tell the truth.
Talk about your current work. In the third section, provide some insight into your current work. How does it relate to your previous work? What life experiences informed it? What are you exploring, attempting or challenging through this work?
Keep it short, sweet, and to the point. Your artist statement is an introduction to your work, not an in-depth analysis of it. Your artist’s statement should be one to two paragraphs and no longer than a page.
  • Your statement should answer the most commonly asked questions about your art, not overwhelm readers with irrelevant facts and minute details.
  • Brevity and efficiency of language are key. A good statement will leave your readers wanting more.
Use simple language. An effective artist’s statement reaches out and welcomes people to your art, no matter how little or how much they know about art to begin with; it never excludes. It should make your work more accessible, not obscure it with convoluted language filled with artsy jargon. [2]
  • Write in simple, straightforward, everyday language.
  • Make “I” statements rather than “you” statements. Talk about what your art does for you, not what it’s supposed to do for the viewers.
III. One More
Let it rest. Your artist’s statement is a piece of very personal writing. Once you’ve finished writing, let it rest overnight before your reread it. Taking some time will help you take a step back and give you the detachment necessary to polish the writing without violating your sense of integrity and safety.
Seek feedback. Before you go public with your statement, get feedback. Show your art and statement to friends, friends’ friends, and maybe even a stranger or two.
  • Make sure your readers get it, that they understand what you want them to understand. When they don’t, or you have to explain yourself, do a rewrite and eliminate the confusion.
  • Keep in mind that you alone are the authority for what is true about your work, but feedback on clarity, tone and technical matters such as spelling and punctuation never hurts.
Revise as needed. Many times, a little rearranging is all that’s necessary to make your statement a clean, clear read. If you need help, find someone who writes or edits and have them fix the problem.
Use your statement. Make the most of your artist statement and use it to promote your work to gallery owners, museum curators, photo editors, publications and the general public.
Save all your notes and drafts. Save all the notes and drafts that you’ve made. You’ll want to revise and update your artist’s statement from time to time to reflect changes in your work. Having your original notes and drafts at your disposal will help you to immerse yourself in your past thought processes and will give you a sense of creative continuity.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Freelance Tips

1. Have Discipline 
  • Stick to daily, weekly, monthly schedule
  • Still work at least 8 hours
  • Stick to deadlines
  • Learn new things

2. Legal Matters

  • You must register your business

  1. 1. Get the Right Licenses and Permits – All businesses need some form of license or permit to operate in their state, county or city. In all likelihood, your freelance business is operated out of your home. So you may need a Home Occupancy Permit and a General Business License. You can get both from your local government website. Or simply use SBA’s “Permit Me” online tool for information about the licenses or permits you may need. Be sure to obtain these before you start doing any business.
  2. 2. Register Your Business Name – If you want to name your business anything other than your given name, then you’ll need to register a “Doing Business As” name with your local government. This guide explains how. If you use your own name, skip this step.

3. Pay taxes

  • Pay Estimated Taxes – This one often comes as a surprise to freelancers, who may be used to having their taxes withheld by an employer. As a freelancer, it’s your responsibility to pay Uncle Sam and your state revenue agency almost as soon as you earn income each quarter. If you expect to owe $1,000 or more when you file your annual return, then you must pay estimated taxes on income. For information on how to calculate and make your payments, read: How To Calculate and Make Estimated Tax Payments.
  • Talk to a tax specialist - it helps if you do this, a lot of them will see you for free to get business advice in hopes you come back at the end of the tax year.  
  • Create invoices - here is a sample
  • If your client doesn’t present you with a contract, you may wish to protect your own interests by producing your own. This blog offers tips: Setting Up a Client Contract.
  • Complete a W-9 Form When You Get a New Client – When you ink an agreement or start work with a new client, it’s likely they will ask you to complete IRS Form W-9 (you may have to ask them for it). Filling out a W-9 is straightforward: provide your name and social security number, or “Doing Business As” name. The client holds this form and doesn’t send it to the IRS; it’s a formal certification by you that your tax ID (SSN) is correct. The form also asks if you are subject to backup withholding – most taxpayers are exempt.
  • Annual Tax Reporting: The 1099 Form – If you’ve earned more than $600 in a year from a client, they have to report these payments to the IRS through Form 1099-Misc. Your client will send you a copy by the end of January each year. Be sure it’s accurate – does the amount the client stated they paid you match your records? You don’t have to do anything with the form other than it in your records and use it as a reference when you report your annual income to the IRS.  Think of it as the freelancer’s equivalent of the W-2 form.


4. Handle your finances
  • This will take some research, but you’ll need to know your worth so that you know how much to charge. You should see if you can find out what other freelancers with similar experience charge and go from there. Also remember that you won’t get things that come with full-time jobs like insurance, 401K, sicks days, vacation, etc. Of course you can do these things on your own, but in the end it will cost you more as a freelancer, so you might want to compensate for that when quoting prices.

Pricing Your work
  • Ask Yourself...

  1. What services am I pricing?
  2. How much does it cost me to run my business?
  3. How much money do I want to make?
  4. What is everyone else charging?
  5. How bad do people want what I have?
  6. How good am I at what I do?
  7. How long have I been doing this?
  8. Will I charge by the hour or the project
  9. How much can my client afford?

There’s no exact formula.

Both hourly pricing and project-based pricing have pros and cons
Pricing is a necessary part of freelancing.
Mistakes are a part of the process.
Your prices on your services and it will also impact your client’s opinion of your services.
Uncertainty is common.
The variety of prices is as wide as the variety of talent levels.
Losing a job isn’t always a bad thing.
Pricing can be a good way to weed out the tire kickers.
Some potential clients will think your prices are high no matter what you charge.
Charging more than you quoted may be necessary.
Starting out you’ll probably have to charge less than you’d like.

5. Set up Professional Communication

  • Set up business email 
  • Im services, skype, google voice
  • Webapps, meeting.com
  • Webpage
  • Blogging
  • Personal website
  • Blog
  • Twitter and facebook, link all pages together
  • Use social media sites such as deviantart, behance…don’t pick one use all 


6. Don’t Expect Stability